Tats...

Discussion in 'The Dungeon' started by SPL170db, Jan 7, 2019.

  1. SPL170db

    SPL170db Trackday winner


    Hi, I'm the Beeb, have we met before?
     
    Phl218 and crashman like this.
  2. Steeltoe

    Steeltoe Breaker of chains.

    If you're ever in NC I know a guy.
     
  3. In Your Corner

    In Your Corner It's a little-known fact...

    I won't even put a bumper sticker on my car.
     
  4. ryoung57

    ryoung57 Well-Known Member


    @Newyork How about you just go ahead a bookmark this link? http://forums.13x.com/index.php?threads/divorce-help-god-damn-epidemic.355193/

    :crackup:
     
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  5. jrsamples

    jrsamples Banned

    That's probably a better reason than most. :beer: :flag:
     
  6. Orvis

    Orvis Well-Known Member

    Well, maybe it does. To a lot of people older than 60 or so tats mean a different thing than it does to younger people. During my earlier years the only people that had tats were most likely ex convicts or people with "lesser education" that were trying to show the general public how tough they were. It generally showed how low life one was.
    I've always wondered why seemingly upstanding individuals would think a tat was necessary. It's a disfigurement to your body that represents a temporary whim that is also expensive to remove when that whim goes away. I always thought it to be as silly as hell and almost like one of those "hold my beer and watch this" moments. ;)
     
  7. Orvis

    Orvis Well-Known Member

    Perhaps you're inadvertently describing tats perfectly. Look at the thought pattern involved when deciding to get one. It's basically the same reason that possesses a person to get a "Harley?" It's nothing more than a status symbol. Hell, there are tons of better bikes on the market than a Harley Davidson. Lighter, better handling, cheaper by far, faster. That Harley represents a sort of "bad boy" persona that some guys dream of. If one wants to look like a tough, mean hombre, get a tattoo or ride a Harley. It's even better if that Harley has ape hanger bars on it that almost require standing up on the pegs just to reach the grips. :D
     
  8. nigel smith

    nigel smith Well-Known Member

    The market is no longer buying what Harley is selling. The company is in dire straits. The only sustainable market for motorcycles in the future will be cheap, efficient commuters. As transportation evolves toward an automated, ride sharing model and away from private vehicle ownership, even that market will only be profitable in underdeveloped nations. Enjoy your big bikes while you can. Your grandchildren will only know them as quaint museum exhibits, located a few yards from the horse drawn buggy display.
     
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  9. ryoung57

    ryoung57 Well-Known Member


    It has nothing to do with transportation, it has to do with leisure activity choices. Very few people commute on an HD compared to the people that cruise on them during the weekends. Younger generations do not engage in the same types of leisure activities (or have the time/money for them).
     
  10. nigel smith

    nigel smith Well-Known Member

    We are presently seeing the leading edge of a paradigm swap in public transportation. The day of the privately owned conveyance is coming to an end. But yes, societal shifts also play into the situation, although I think the relative paucity of entry level commuter bikes contributes greatly to the lack of interest from our youth.
     
  11. SPL170db

    SPL170db Trackday winner


    [​IMG]
     
  12. Mongo

    Mongo Sacko

    You forgot service members - more often than not Navy. Saw a lot of those tats growing up on all sorts of people. They were all able to cover them in a business environment tho.
     
  13. Fonda Dix

    Fonda Dix Well-Known Member

    I see a huge threat to freedom once this happens.

    No more off roading. No more hare scrambles. No country drives to clear the head.

    America was built on the freedom the automobile delivered to the common man. I would be very concerned about an automated, scripted (read, government controlled) transportation system as the only resource to use.
     
  14. nigel smith

    nigel smith Well-Known Member

    I share your concerns but, barring societal collapse, that future seems inevitable. You can clearly see the foundation being laid all around you.
     
  15. Mongo

    Mongo Sacko

    So people have said since the dark ages :crackup: Society is doing just fine from what I see. I mean actually see not what the media or morons on social media tell me I should be seeing.
     
  16. nigel smith

    nigel smith Well-Known Member

    People have voiced concerns about autonomous transportation systems since the dark ages? Perhaps you mistook my intent? Societal collapse is perhaps the only thing that would prevent eventual total government control of transportation systems.
     
  17. Mongo

    Mongo Sacko

    I was addressing societal collapse. The government hasn't even gotten public transport right, no way they'll get autonomous going in the next dozen or more generations so that's not even a moot point it's so ridiculous :D
     
  18. nigel smith

    nigel smith Well-Known Member

    When has a lack of capability prevented government action? Here's my prediction. Autonomous transportation systems in major metropolitan areas in 20-25 years. Nationwide autonomous grid in fifty. Seventy five years from now privately owned automobiles will exist only as collector's items and he operated only in designated areas and at historic events. We may both live long enough for the first part of my prediction to come to fruition. A cheeseburger and a beer says we can take a self driving car to dinner in Atlanta by 2040.
     
  19. Mongo

    Mongo Sacko

    If there is autonomous transport in the ATL by 2040 it will absolutely all come from the private sector. Hell, the MARTA train route is nothing but two actual lines that cross each other with a couple minor spurs at the ends. There are a bunch of different public bus lines rather than one. It's ridiculous and will not be tied together by anyone any time soon.
     
  20. nigel smith

    nigel smith Well-Known Member

    Practically all innovation comes from the private sector, albeit often driven by government demand. I'm certain that will also be the case with autonomous transportation, but I expect heavy government regulation and involvement. If you extrapolate from current self driving car development, ever more efficient GPS and computer grids, and the demand for Uber type services, it's not hard to see what's coming. Do we have a bet? Death of either one of us voids the wager, of course. We'll both be on up there a bit by 2040.
     

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