Any input on measuring fuel in the tank between sessions?

Discussion in 'Information For New Racers' started by ____Kurt____, Apr 6, 2021.

  1. ____Kurt____

    ____Kurt____ Member

    So I've been pitting with a buddy of mine who measures the gas in his bike after every session then refuels to a set amount for the next session. He uses a siphon to pull out all the gas into a measuring container and measures the remaining gas, then adds whats needed or makes adjustments depending on what he's trying to do, so he's never carrying unnecessary weight.
    Me being me, I've adapted his procedures but I want to improve on it if I can. I ordered an 8 quart oil container with a spout off Amazon to use as my measuring container. Just need to get a siphon and I should be good.
    I wanted to see what everyone else was doing and using.
    Thank you
     
  2. Phl218

    Phl218 Lemme ask my wife

    measuring stick. marked in liters / quarts

    put in 1 liter, put stick in, notch where fluid ends.

    do not rinse, but repeat.

    cheap and accurate, if sick is inserted with repeatable position / angle and accuracy
     
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  3. tjnyzf

    tjnyzf Well-Known Member

    When Tgold welded up the endurance tank to increase the capacity he also welded in a slot and some fittings to hook up a clear fuel line as a sight gauge. Each mark on the tube is one gallon[​IMG]
     
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  4. Shenanigans

    Shenanigans in Mr.Rogers neighborhood

    Why?
     
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  5. Mongo

    Mongo Administrator

    Measuring stick and add 25% more than you think you'll need...
     
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  6. TurboBlew

    TurboBlew Registers Abusers

    improve on it? Put a petcock thats accessible on the sump of the tank and gravity drain it while you do other stuff. Obsessing over fuel load between races or track day sessions?
     
  7. ____Kurt____

    ____Kurt____ Member

    I like the stick idea because then there is no siphoning to check the level.
    This is what I had in mind container wise. Measuring container & funnel combo.
    We did this last year for my track days but racing this year.
    I was curious to see what everyone else was doing because I see different Measuring containers in the pits but never thought about it till the off season.
     

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  8. Mongo

    Mongo Administrator

    Stick means no need for a measuring anything, pour in until you hit the right line.
     
  9. Mongo

    Mongo Administrator

    Basically it comes down to this - don't worry about the silly shit. Being exact on the fuel level is absolutely silly shit. You at this point will not go even a hundredth of a second faster with the "proper" fuel load. You won't go any slower with a full tank either. You just aren't remotely pushing the limits enough for it to matter. If being OCD helps calm you before going out then by all means go for it but honestly you'd be way better off cleaning your bike, that at least is a great way to find little things coming loose or even missing or wires that have worked their way into a bad spot and such.
     
  10. Raceless man

    Raceless man Well-Known Member

    Fuel has weight..couldnt you just scale it ?
     
  11. Mongo

    Mongo Administrator

    Why take your tank off and weigh it each time you go out?

    You guys are way way way overthinking this. When you get to the point you need it, you'll know how to do it. Actually the mechanic you'll have hired at that point or the team you're riding for will know how to do it. Unless that is true you don't need to mess with it.
     
  12. Tristan

    Tristan Well-Known Member


    Looks Factory!
     
  13. Mongo

    Mongo Administrator


    I'm betting this setup has me writing a new rule before the season is out.... :crackup:
     
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  14. stangmx13

    stangmx13 Well-Known Member

    +1 to a marked stick

    Red flags during club racing are really stressful if you are running tight on fuel, especially if you don't have much help in the pits. Sometimes you'll barely have time to take your helmet off and put warmers on. Taking the time to add fuel and stressing about it is time that you could be relaxing and cooling off instead. 50-100% extra fuel fixes that. For a club race, that's not even 10lbs.
     
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  15. TurboBlew

    TurboBlew Registers Abusers

    I guess its like folks removing the radiator fan to be a weight weenie for 1lb til they boil over on the grid on a warm day.
     
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  16. ____Kurt____

    ____Kurt____ Member

    Ok ok ok, yes I know I'm overthinking this lol. I was just pondering about it. I use to fill 'er up at the beginning of a track day and fill 'er back up on lunch and be good for the rest of the day. Then I was slapped up side the head with a remark like, " hey you know your carrying like another 20lbs than you need to be!" So I've been doing this fuel regiment for the second half of last season. I'm lucky I got a pit helper (wife) and I'm pretty much only checking gas and doing my helmet. Thanks for all the responses!
     
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  17. tgold

    tgold Well-Known Member

    No need to worry about making a rule Mongo. It was a giant pain in the ass to weld so the the chances of there being another person dumb enough to waste that much time should be low. :D

    True story: My wife commented that our electric bill was pretty high not long after I finished it :rolleyes:
     
  18. Mongo

    Mongo Administrator

  19. D-Zum

    D-Zum Alex’s Ohvale Maintenance & Transport Service

    For a track day??????

    Did you win Track Day? You never mentioned that this tech tip helped you win or not. I'm on pins and needles here.
     
  20. ____Kurt____

    ____Kurt____ Member

    Lol, no I definitely never have won a track day but I can promise you I have definitely DNF'd a track day.
    But, yes. About halfway through last season, I started pitting with a good friend of mine who races. His racing habits have worn off on me in the pits in preparation for me to race.
     

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