Enclosed Trailer Features

Discussion in 'Information For New Racers' started by prm, Nov 3, 2019.

  1. prm

    prm Member

    For those who have used enclosed trailers, what features have proven useful? I’d be looking at one no larger than 6x12. What about 2 axles? Seems the piece of mind from a flat not being an instant crisis would be nice for long trips. May consider a cot for overnighters. What else?

    Ramp vs. two rear doors. Seems a ramp would be easier, but is that true?
     
  2. K51000

    K51000 Well-Known Member

    In on page one, he he
     
  3. R/T Performance

    R/T Performance Well-Known Member

    Ramp door is a must just like pitbull TRS's
    Screw less exterior look the best
    Rv style handle on entry door for camping in it
    nice raxx stand hangers to mount the stands on the walls

    Single axle is fine for that small size two axle leaf its not like you can drive with one tire off without strapping the axle without tires up
     
    RRP likes this.
  4. prm

    prm Member

    Thanks. Purpose would be track days with one or two nights at the track. Possibly some CCS races. Not opposed to some basic mods, but don’t want to customize too much so it can still be used for basic utility if necessary.

    What about size? 5x8 is likely too small. 5x10 or 6x10 workable? Or definitely 6x12? I realize bigger is better, but what is passably functional?

    So far, on the must have list:
    Rear ramp
    Pitbull TRS
    RV handle on side door

    Nice to have:
    Wall mounting system
     
  5. Kurlon

    Kurlon Well-Known Member

    If you're staying IN it, RV style roof vent, max air cover and a Vortex or Fantastic fan in said vent, along with GOOD side or floor vents so you can quickly change the air out in there.
     
    Brian_J likes this.
  6. Shocker

    Shocker Well-Known Member

    Shore power and AC is the best addition I made to my trailer. Pit Bull TRS is a close second. :D
     
  7. prm

    prm Member

    AC is mandatory! I don’t do well in hot and humid conditions. Any small AC units that don’t need massive amounts of electrical power?
     
  8. Shocker

    Shocker Well-Known Member

    I installed a Dometic Brisk Air II 13.5k BTU unit with a Microair Easy Start 364 unit which allows the AC to run off a Honda 2000 genny or even plug into a standard wall outlet.
     
  9. prm

    prm Member

    ^^Perfect. I have a Honda 2000.
     
  10. TLR67

    TLR67 Well-Known Member

    Yeah but then when you need tire warmers or a coffee pot your screwed... My requirements were below...

    AC.. on roof 35000 BTU w 50 AMP panel
    Lights, Outlets in and outside.
    8.5 Wide at least 18 long... always get bigger than you need...
    Rubber Coin Flooring with TRS’s
    Ramp Door
    Dexter Axles
    Aluminum Rims and Radials
    No V Nose
     
  11. Shocker

    Shocker Well-Known Member

    I've found 30A power at most tracks I've been at so I still had power to run tire warmers off my shore power.

    When I have alternate sources (like 115v outlets provided by the track) that I can plug my warmers into and then I use the EU2000 to power the AC.
     
  12. ricracer16

    ricracer16 Well-Known Member

    Not trying to hijack your post but I am also looking for a trailer as well. But I am curious on why no V-Nose? I thought it was better for a little more room and aerodynamics?

    thanks,

    Rick
     
  13. prm

    prm Member

    I too was curious about the no V-nose comment. I’ve read mixed reports on whether it really helps with aerodynamics. Can’t say I’ve read that it ever hurts. I want one for the extra space and if it helps with mileage, that’s just a bonus.
     
  14. ducnut

    ducnut Well-Known Member

    I’ve owned and pulled several different sized trailers, V-nose and flat. The V-nose will have side-to-side push, at the trailer nose (felt in the rear of the tow vehicle), in crosswinds and passing/getting passed by semis. My current V-nose provides 2-1/2’ of extra floor length, providing 8.75 square feet more of floor space.

    If the trailer stands taller than the tow vehicle, a slant-roof, V-nose is worth the effort to find/order. No higher than 6-1/2’ interior height, though. Length won’t have as much effect on fuel mileage as frontal area.

    You don’t say what you’re towing with, but, I’d definitely do a 7’ width. That’ll be much easier to fit two bikes, side-by-side, and will allow you to lay a mattress across the trailer for sleeping. And, I’d do a 16’ length, so you can have all your living arrangement in the nose and bike crap to the rear. That’ll be really handy when you show up at the track, it’s raining, and you need to camp out. Or, if you travel somewhere to ride and need to overnight on the road (truckstop showers are only ~$12). I can’t do that with my 12’.

    Torsion axle(s) only. If you do a 16’ length, you’ll have two axles and having them torsion will help support the tongue weight, plus ride much better. Spring axles beat the trailer, cargo, and tow vehicle. And, you don’t want tandem axles on something short like a 12’ and have the trailer oversprung for the weight you’re going to carry, because it’ll ride rougher and you’ll feel that in the tow vehicle.

    Brakes on all axles, period. I owned one 12’ without brakes and will never again do that.

    Ramp door, only.

    It’s fine to get an RV-style side door. But, you want the bar latch, as well. That’s the same latching system you see on the rear of trailers. An RV-style latch can be pried open with a large screwdriver. Walmart sells 3-pack padlocks.

    If you’re going to do an A/C unit and plan to habitate inside, get the insulation package, Nudo-lined walls and ceiling, coin floor liner, extra lighting, shore power, 110V receptacles, and you may consider a couple windows. Living inside the the thing, you’ll quickly realize why you want a longer trailer.

    Radial tires.

    Metal transitions from the floor to ramp and ramp to ground.

    You’ll want open/close-style side vents. Most trailers come with vents that are just holes in the walls with a plastic cover over them. With A/C, you’ll want to be able to close them.

    With wanting an A/C unit, you’re going to have to order the trailer. Be sure and get it how you want it and plan for the future. Spending a few extra bucks now and pulling a bit more trailer than you may currently need will save a lot of money, down the road. I’m in the predicament of needing more trailer and am shopping. If I’d just bought more trailer ~6yrs ago, I wouldn’t be looking at another, now.

    Lastly, I’m a big fan of a weight distribution hitches. I use an Andersen, even on my 12’ enclosed. It takes out shudder, stops porpoising, it’s quiet, and really stabilizes the ride. Even though I have an auto-ride height airbag system, I always hook up the weight distribution chains (just 2 chains and easy to do).
     
  15. ricracer16

    ricracer16 Well-Known Member

    Excellent info! Thanks and of it helps, I'll be towing with 2011 Merc Sprinter 2500 high roof


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  16. prm

    prm Member

    Thanks also. Good things to consider. I’m towing with an F150 (3.5 EB). Really just looking for an upgrade to loading bike in truck and offering the option of a place to sleep at the track, but you make good points.
     
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  17. ricracer16

    ricracer16 Well-Known Member

    I usually just haul race bikes in the back if the van. And it's fine, but last year I raced at Barber with AHRMA, and the heat there is devastating, even at night. So this year I decided to rent a camper. Still 2 bikes and a monkey to get around and it was so much better having a place to escape the heat. After speaking to some friends we decided that maybe it's time we just get ourselves a trailer and be more comfortable. The extra room will be nice in the van and have everything else in the trailer.

    Thanks again for all the info and letting me ask questions in your post.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  18. Kurlon

    Kurlon Well-Known Member

    If you have "friends" at the track that like to prank... bar latches on all doors while you're sleeping inside is a recipe for a rough morning.
     
    prm likes this.
  19. KneeDragger_c69

    KneeDragger_c69 Well-Known Member

    I always looked my lock on the hatch, just so that wouldn't happen.

    Note to others ;)
     
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  20. ducnut

    ducnut Well-Known Member

    You wouldn’t need to have any concerns with height. Just know whatever the ceiling height is, your door opening will be ~6” shorter. That’s because the torsion spring/cable drum for the rear door is across the top of the opening. So, if you were to want 6’6” door opening, you’ll need a 7’ ceiling height. The exception to this is Featherlite model 1610 trailers have an available torsion spring in the hinge, which eliminates that overhead mechanism and provides for cable-free door assist.

    That’s exact how I started out. I grew tired of asking people for help loading/unloading and everytime I did it, there was so much risk. Plus, I always worried about someone stealing my stuff.

    Your truck will easily pull about anything. I can tell you there’s almost no perceptible difference between pulling a 7’X12’ and 7’X18’, of same heights and torsion axles.

    Currently, I’m trying to decide between a 7’X20’ or 8.5’X20’. The 7’ width matches up with pickup widths so much better, but, I’m giving up 30sq feet of floor space and I can get three bikes across the back of an 8.5’ width. I have a topper, so the 7’ width in a slant-roof would be the better choice for aerodynamics.

    These shelving units work great for storing stuff. You can use conduit clamps (electrical dept) to secure them to the walls. Then, use bungee cords from post-to-post and whatever size clear totes for storage. If you were to buy a V-nose you can put one on either side of the V, or all the way across a flat-nose, and have everything up and out of the way.


    AD665608-1575-434B-8D44-555F01E6C2BC.jpeg


    I forgot to mention to be sure and get a spare. Always pack a floor jack, air tank or small compressor, and whatever tools needed for a tire change.
     
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