R6 Piston Install

Discussion in 'Tech' started by crab1092, Aug 4, 2018.

  1. crab1092

    crab1092 Member

    The cylinders of my R6 have a pronounced bevel on the top. When I am installing my pistons and rings the oil ring clears the ring compressor but gets stuck in the bevel. I have screwed around with this all day but I cannot get them installed. Am i doing something wrong or is there some secret to this?
     
  2. Knotcher

    Knotcher Well-Known Member

    Do you have a piston installation tool?
     
  3. crab1092

    crab1092 Member

    Im assuming you mean the ring compressor? If so yes i have a Wiseco 67MM tapered one.
     
  4. Chako

    Chako Member

    hit it harder, faster. it has to be a very quick motion.
     
  5. crab1092

    crab1092 Member

    Tried that on one more out of frustration than anything.Piston felt tight in the cylinder so I pulled it out to find a broken top oil ring.
     
  6. crab1092

    crab1092 Member

    Chako think I better understand what you are saying now that i got home and tinkered with it some more. I put the piston and rings into the compressor and placed the piston skirt into the cylinder so that the oil ring was probably 1/4 or 1/2 inch from the bottom off the compressor. I twisted the compressor and piston in the cylinder to make sure it was aligned. Then with a swift firm hit it popped in. I was lightly tapping it in before and only put real force once it was stopped. That doesn't work.
     
  7. RM Racing

    RM Racing Tool user

    You have to square the piston to the bore. Use some oil. A piston mallet is helpful as well.
     
    MELK-MAN likes this.
  8. humblepie

    humblepie Well-Known Member

    It's possible the Inside diameter of your installation tool is larger than the Inside diameter of the cylinder bore. This greatly complicates installation.
     
    MELK-MAN likes this.
  9. crab1092

    crab1092 Member

    Ive tried to get an accurate ID of the tool but since its tapered I cannot get repeatable measurements. The measurements i have gotten indicate that it is not smaller than the cylinder but I cannot say for absolute certain. As Rick said above I think getting it squared is key and then giving it a solid whack. I have to wait for my new rings to come in to give it a whirl, but I am hopeful that I can get them in now. This whole thing is so frustrating. I have built 6 or 7 4G63 mitsubishi engines when i drag raced cars and not once did I have any issue getting a piston in.
     
  10. RM Racing

    RM Racing Tool user

    I have substituted the old oil control rings for new ones in the past. They are more flexible. You won't lose power.
     
  11. humblepie

    humblepie Well-Known Member

    I know an old guy, WAY smarter than I will ever be, always re-uses the ring sets.(Thorough cleaning) Replaces top compression ring only.
     
  12. crab1092

    crab1092 Member

    I have new rings but i damaged some of the top oil rings trying to install them. I have multiple sets of used pistons that are in good shape that I never pulled the rings off. You guys are saying if I clean the used oil rings and inspect for scuffs or wear, that they would be suitable to run again? I would still be using brand new top and middle rings.
     
  13. crab1092

    crab1092 Member

    [​IMG]

    So I cleaned up some old rings I had to try it again. The picture is the result I get, which is no different as before. The piston goes into the cylinder but is obviously too tight so i pull it out to find the broken upper oil ring. Once I pull all three oil rings off and put just the top two rings on I can pop the piston in with no issue which I am assuming means its not the ring compressor.
     
  14. lonewrench

    lonewrench Mr.Charles

    What the fuck do you know ?
     
  15. RM Racing

    RM Racing Tool user

    Try one with the used oil control rings. Use more oil. Don't force it if it stops. Remove it and start over.
     
  16. crab1092

    crab1092 Member

    [​IMG]

    Finally got them in. I used the used oil rings, and the bigger key i think it getting the pistons absolutely perfectly square. As you can see from the shiny everywhere I didnt skimp on the oil either. Thanks for everyone's input.
     
  17. mike-guy

    mike-guy Well-Known Member

    Dude thats awesome. I've rebuilt an old 77 gs750 but didnt care if it made 20hp (which may be accurate) and burnt oil. Are you just sending stuff out to be machined and building it yourself? Hoping one day I have the time and money to do that to a motor myself. It's got to be extremely rewarding to race a motor you built.
     
  18. crab1092

    crab1092 Member

    I sent the head off to get done. The bottom end of these engines don't really need any machining. I measured everything on the bottom end to make sure everything is where it needs to be. Put new rods, bearings, pistons, rings, and every gasket and oring was replaced. I am doing it exactly for what the reason you stated. I love working on these things(most of the time) and ripping around the track on something I built every component of is something I will be proud of. Now all this is assuming the thing doesn't blow up upon starting. Right now I am riding around on Lockett's engine out of his totalled bike.
     
  19. mike-guy

    mike-guy Well-Known Member

    O shoot who is this? Did Jill finally drop the hammer and say no more racing fr him?

    Yea when I did that old motor I was talking about I didn't touch the crank. If you looks it up the old GS750s actually had roller bearings too in the bottom end so they really didnt need servicing.
     
  20. rob linders

    rob linders Well-Known Member

    Guys that know, @RM Racing, @humblepie , @lonewrench if he was checking the crank bearing clearance with new bolts from the new rods and possibly torqued them a few times, should he put in new rod bolts again?

    I've seen multiple 06+ R6's spit out a rod when guys reused the old bolts or old rods, so I always paid to replace them when mine was getting freshened.

    TIA for the education.
     

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