New MotoGP finishing rule

Discussion in 'General' started by thrak410, Dec 6, 2018.

  1. thrak410

    thrak410 My member is well known

    https://mobile.reuters.com/article/amp/idUSKBN1O4285

    So does this mean the first part of the bike or body to cross, or the last part of the bike or body to cross?

     
  2. ChemGuy

    ChemGuy Harden The F%@# Up!

    If you crash, and your bike slides across first, your time stops when the first part of your body crosses. Not when your bike crosses. And vice versa.
     
    2blueYam likes this.
  3. dsapsis

    dsapsis El Jefe de los Monos

    Neither. Read it again. Front of bike or body, whichever crosses the line after the other part.
     
  4. eggfooyoung

    eggfooyoung You no eat more!

  5. dsapsis

    dsapsis El Jefe de los Monos

    I'm wondering with the rule as written, if in a very close battle, a rider might extend their arm/hand forward to gain a marginal advantage. That seems to me like an unintended possibility of the rule (mostly intended for the crash provision, per above).
     
  6. Monsterdood

    Monsterdood Well-Known Member

    This is the real reason Pedrosa retired... he would never outreach anyone for the win.
     
  7. eggfooyoung

    eggfooyoung You no eat more!

    Was my first thought as well. The new leg dangle? Especially during qualifying?
     
  8. Ducati is going to end up making the riders look like a god damn narwhal. An aerodynamic narwhal. But a god damn narwhal.


    And yes I’m fully aware of the rules prohibiting shit in the helmet but they’ll find a way. They always find a way.
     
  9. rabbit73

    rabbit73 Well-Known Member

  10. thrak410

    thrak410 My member is well known

    What if you and the bike are sliding backward?

    Confusingly written. So it’s the last part of the first ‘piece’ (rider or bike) to cross?

    Edit - I think, I got it... whichever part crosses the line second, it will be the front of that. So if you fall off and slide in front of your bike, your time will be when the first part of the bike crosses the line?
     
    BigBird likes this.
  11. eggfooyoung

    eggfooyoung You no eat more!

    Yes
     
    thrak410 likes this.
  12. Phl218

    Phl218 Lemme ask my wife

    Spaghetti cannon
     
  13. Mongo

    Mongo Sacko

    Seems like a silly overreaction rule to me. You crash you don't finish, even if you slide across the line. Want to finish - don't crash...
     
    418, Robin172 and ToofPic like this.
  14. SPL170db

    SPL170db Trackday winner

    Would've been cool to see Bowling Bau put the rule to the test.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. eggfooyoung

    eggfooyoung You no eat more!

    Isn't that Nicky, at Indy?
     
    418 likes this.
  16. BigBird

    BigBird blah

  17. gixxernaut

    gixxernaut Hold my beer & watch this

    The wording seems a bit ambiguous as to whether it only applies in a crash situation (where rider and bike are separated) or if it applies in all circumstances.
     
  18. pickled egg

    pickled egg This page intentionally left blank

    I read it as the winner is the one who crosses the line first, not whose transponder does.
     
    BigBird likes this.
  19. BigBird

    BigBird blah

     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2018
  20. gixxernaut

    gixxernaut Hold my beer & watch this

    Yes? New rule is still ambiguous. Starts off explaining why it was made but then doesn't specify that the new rule only kicks in during a crash.

    "In the future, the finish time will be determined by the first part of the rider or his motorcycle, whichever crosses the finish line last."

    Quite literally this says it doesn't mean squat when the front tire passes the finish line if the rider is in a tuck with both hands on the handlebars. The rider who extends his middle finger will finish in front of the rider who doesn't, all else being equal.

    I understand what they're trying to say. I would argue they haven't said it very well. Sooner or later a rider is going to challenge this by attempting a last second "Superman" and produce photographic evidence that both rider and bike were across the line before his competitor even though the first part of his competitor's bike crossed first.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2018

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